Thursday, December 12, 2019

Stories by Louisburg 8th Graders Emma Joyner, Maurice Clifton, Virginia Perry, Annie Boddie, Dec. 12, 1919

From The Franklin Times, Louisburg, N.C., Dec. 12, 1919. Physical Geography students in ninth grade at Louisburg High School wrote essays that wove facts learn in class into an interesting story. The following essays were printed in the paper.

A Play House by the Brook

By Emma Lawrence Joyner         

One bright June day while out walking in the woods, I came to a little brook which immediately attracted my attention, for there, on one side of it was a charming play house, made, no doubt, by Mother Nature.

This which was so wonderful to my child-like mind a large tree whose numerous branches extended almost to the ground and found an admirable swing. In the middle was an old stump on which moss grew. This furnished an ideal table.

The most interesting feature of this attractive little play house however, was a very comfortable rock chair, sculptured by the weather. I sat in this and found it a very good resting place after so long a tramp through the woods.

Pretty wild flowers surrounding tis play house further beautified it and made it complete.

On a Lonesome Trail

By Maurice Clifton

“Gee, this is some walking. These little round stones hurt my feet,” said a scout to his fellow scout, who was just behind him. “I wonder how much father it is to the top of this mountain,” said the same scout, who was becoming a little more discouraged.

“I don’t know, but I hope it isn’t far, because it is so troublesome walking on rocks, in gulleys, and a 12 inch plank over a creek, I’ll tell you, it isn’t much fun,” said the other scout.

The trail began to get narrower and narrower the farther they went. They had to go through thick bushes, and walk in washouts, and sometimes the trail led them right up to an old stream bed. At times they had to step over old logs which were across the path. They saw small fragments of rock which had come from some larger rocks which had weathered and crumbled.

They were near the top, they had one more creek to cross, they had to go through a forest about a quarter of a mile, through some tall broom straw, and then they could see the top of the mountain. When they had reached the top, they could view in the distance a river meandering its way through the foot of the mountains. They could see for miles around in all directions. They could observe great rocks which were being worn away by the weather. One boy saw a lake and he asked his scoutmaster what it was doing up there. His scoutmaster told him that it was probably a crater lake.

Most of the boys had studied “Physical Geography,” and because of this they discovered many very interesting things on top of the mountain on the “Lonesome Trail.” One boy said, “That trail deserves its name.”

After the scouts had devoured what little food they had, they started down the trail to their camp at the foot of the mountains, both leader and followers ready to proclaim a most delightful as well as a profitable experience.

A Play House by the Brook

By Virginia E. Perry

One bright July morning, a friend and I planned to go out tramping to see what we could find to amuse ourselves. After wandering for a time, we came to a beautiful meadow through which a tiny stream flowed. We started up stream and found that the stream started from a spring at the foot of a gentle slope. We then started down stream and suddenly we saw where the water had begun cutting the banks away. The farther we went we found it cutting more until it had cut a real gorge, not very deep, but the water was rushing through swiftly doing as much work as possible. We continued our journey until we came to where the stream flowed through an almost level plain and on account of this the rate of the stream was checked greatly.  Jutting from the bank was a medium size tree limb. This held the sediment because the stream had lost nearly all its power to move its load along. Day after day the sediment was deposited there until finally there was a bar about a foot wide, the top just above the water, extending from one part of bank to another, forming a complete lake. On the bank facing the lake was a small cave. I imagine it was caused by the stream flowing against it and cutting away all the material it could, leaving only the hard strata and rock. The top of the cave was formed by an overhanging rock. My friend suggested that we build a play house in the cave and one on the bar. We did so. We used the lake as our highway from the home of the shore to the one on the bar of sediment.

A Play House by the Brook

By Annie Willis Boddie

It was a beautiful play house, situated on the large rock overhanging the picturesque little brook. The rock was of special interest to us because of the scratches and worn places on it, which go to prove that it was brought down by the great glacier which once covered our great continent. The brook, too, was interesting and unusually convenient for washing the broken bits of china we used as dishes. Sometimes little islands would form in the very middle of the stream. Whenever this would happen we would desert our dolls and domestic life and become pirates as bold and as blood thirsty as ever reached the pages of a history book. Although our play house was not as attractive in winter as in summer, we loved to play on its icy surface and see the water of the book hurrying on under the layer of frozen snow. One day we took one of mother’s glasses out with us, filled it with water and left it. The next morning we hurried out after it but the water had frozen and the glass was broken in two. 

When spring came it rained for 10 successive days. Needless to say we had to remain indoors. When the water subsided we immediately visited the play house but Alas! the brook had become flooded and overflowed its banks and our play house was no more.

Business of Hertford County Commissioners, Dec. 12, 1919

From the Hertford County Herald, Ahoskie, N.C., Friday, Dec. 12, 1919

Meeting of Hertford County Commissioners

The Board of County Commissioners of Hertford County met on the 1st day of December, 1919. All members of the Board were present.

The committee on courthouse and tank and jail are continued.

The committee to build the bridge at Deep Creek is still continued.

The official bond of S.E. Vaughn presented to the Board which was unanimously accepted. Books of the Ahoskie township turned over to said Vaughn for collection of taxes.

T.T. Parker paid into the Board the sum of $20 and G.B. Storey the amount of $30 for hire of prisoners.

The Board examined, in compliance with the law, all bonds of the County officers which were passed or sufficient.

The Board received the sum of $24 as premiums from the fairs on products from the County Home and the Board voted unanimously to give the sum of $10 to Mr. M. Brown, keeper of the Home, as a reward.

On motion and carried, the taxes on $3,500 cotton listed by Jno. Jenkins, St. Johns township, is allowed refunded; said amount being a liability and cotton being in Norfolk; and said Jenkins taking the necessary oath.

On motion and carried Mr. C.W. Winborne is allowed refund of taxes on $200 error in listing.

On motion and carried J.H. Hall is refunded taxes on $800 in cotton the said Hall taking the necessary oath.

A petition received from the Board of Education asking for an election to be held in Murfreesboro Graded School District No. 1 and on motion and carried the following order, to-wit: An election is hereby ordered in Murfreesboro Graded School District No. 1 on the 6th day of January, 1920, in accordance with the provisions of chapter 55 public law 1915 of North Carolina, the amount of said bonds to be issued is $25,000, the rate of interest they are to bear 6 per cent, payable semi-annually, the length of the time the bonds are to run is 20 years and the tax is to be 30 cents on $100 valuation of property and 90 cents on the poll.

It is also ordered that a new registration be had in said school district and that C.W. Garner be Registrar for securing the new registration in said District, and that J.J. Parker and J.R. Evans be appointed Judges of that election.

On motion the Board votes to make an additional appropriation of $150 per year for Home Demonstration work.

It is ordered that the Clerk of the Board publish in the Hertford County Herald the law regarding the payment of dog taxes and the tax collectors to use every means possible to collect the tax and continue to collect.

The matter of selecting the Bank for County Treasurer was taken up and the Bank of Winton submitted proposition to pay 4 per cent on daily balances for all funds in their hands from the County, their bid being the highest, and the bank was declared the Treasurer.

The Board orders the Clerk of the Board to write the Boards of Road supervisors that they will be required to make report of their receipts and disbursements by the first Monday in January, 1920, and all failing to make said report will be reported to the Grand Jury at February term of court.

The farm demonstrator, E.W. Gaither, gave to the Board a recapitulation of his work as Demonstrator during the time he has been in the County.

All county officers made their official reports to the Board required by law.

Superintendent of Health made his monthly report.

The following accounts presented and ordered paid, to-wit:

J.H. Hines, repairs to Liverman’s mill, $294.45

A.S. Mitchell, services as Road Supervisor of Ahoskie, Building bridge Horse Swamp, $50
Board of Review, $63

R. Scull, Sheriff, salary to December 1st, $300

W.E. Cullens, salary, Supervisor, $150

W.E. Cullens, expense account for November, $104.06

M.M. Browne, amnt. paid for work, $2

J.A. Horton, work at county home, $10.60

J.T. Askew, work at Stoney Creek bridge, $31.50

Turner Taylor, work at Stoney Creek bridge, $16.50

Dan Browne, work at Stoney Creek bridge, $18

Paul Lewis, work at Stoney Creek bridge, $12

Jno. Parker, work at Stoney Creek bridge, $3

T.W. Hill, work at Stoney Creek bridge, $8

C.E. Boyette, services County Commissioner, 1919, $118.70

J.R. Evans, repairing gutters at courthouse, $100

J.M. Eley, services as County Commissioner, 1919, $144.96

Charlie Rountree, keeping Parkers’ ferry, November, $35

J.E. Jones, board, etc., prisoners, $19.35

F.G. Tayloe, Services County Commissioner, $48.90

Town of Winton, light bill, $1.50

Edwards and Broughton, stationery, Register of Deeds, $5.44

J.T. Barnes, lumber of Stoney Creek bridge, $119.12

Edwards and Broughton, stationery, C.S. Court, $6.18

Ernest W. Teague, tax book, $36.80

I.J. Debose, keeping B.H. ferry, November, $40

Askew Bros, supplies, $84.55

Ben Stephens, Hill’s ferry for November, $40

Matthew Wilson, Tar Landing ferry, November, $40

I.F. Snipes, services, Board of Review, $138.35

Jno. E. Vann, services on Financing committee, $10

Winton Cooperage Co., lumber for Winton ferry, $70.88

J.H. Hines, dressing lumber, $9

E.J. Gerock, supplies for County Home, $47.89

R.J. Britton, services as welfare officer, $41.66

W.D. Browne, services as colored demonstration agent, $10

F.G. Tayloe, extra services as County Commissioner, 1919, $55.40

W.M. Marsh, support to Mary Lassiter, $3

J.C. Benthall, support to Carter children, $1.50

Mrs. J.W. Minton, support for self, $3

C.E. Boyette, support for Mary Vaughan, $2

H.H. Taylor, support for Mrs. Hill, $5

H.V. Parker, support for Jno. Griffin, $3

Judie White, support for self, $3

Pauline Lassiter, support for self, $3

Adament Joyner, support for self, $2.50

Starkey Hare, support for Annie Burch, $5

Henry Lassiter, support for self, $5

S.J. Dilday, support to Dorsey Holloman, $4

Andrew Sessoms, support for self, $5

No further business before the Board, it adjourned to meet again on the first Monday in January, 1920.

--S.P. Winborne, Chairman
--Jno. A. Northcott, Clerk to Board

Women's and "Girls' Clubs Making Great Strides, Says Jane S. McKimmon, Dec. 12, 1919

From the Hertford County Herald, Ahoskie, N.C., Friday, Dec. 12, 1919. The women's and girls' clubs in this article are the earliest version of Home Demonstration Clubs for women and 4-H Clubs for girls. 

Women’s and Girls’ Clubs Are Active. . . Preliminary Report Shows Great Gains. . . Mrs. Jane S. McKimmon, Now in Charge of This Work, Makes Preliminary Report, Which Evidences Great Growth in Every Department

Raleigh, December 10—The preliminary report of Mrs. Jane S. McKimmon for the year 1919 shows that the girls and women enrolled in the club work of the Home Demonstration Division have again accomplished great things during the year. The work has been greatly extended, as there are now 62 counties organized with home agents in charge. They have established 666 woman’s clubs, 424 girls’ clubs and 226 community clubs, with a total membership of 77,194.

As to some of the things which these women and girls have accomplished, reports show that there were 1,966 poultry club members who raised 70,828 fowls. At the State Fair club members representing Anson County won $75 in premium money, and Mrs. A.M. Redfern reports that these members now have on hand a good supply of poultry and poultry products for sale and use during the winter. A number of the girls have stored eggs in waterglass for home use this winter.

Others, to the number of 588 girls and women, produced 54,612 pounds of butter, which they sold at an average price of 59 cents per pound.

In canning work, the preliminary report shows that 1362,890 quarts of vegetables and fruits, worth $405,242.83 were canned during the year; 37,070 pounds of vegetables worth $5,441.07 were dried; 45,151 pounds of fruits and vegetables worth $5,530.86 were brined during the same period.

It is not canning alone, however, that the girls and women in the home demonstration work have concerned themselves. At the present time the school teachers in many of the rural communities are cooperating with the home agents in giving demonstrations as to how to prepare and serve balanced meals and wholesome school lunches.

The shortage of help in the household has caused considerable interest to be shown in demonstrations of electrical plants for the operation of washing machines, church, home lighting systems and home water works. As a result of the activity of the home demonstration agents, at least 1,115 of these electrical plans have been put in, and to date 493 washing machines have been installed. Many other conveniences, as a result of this electrical power, have also been added to the farm houses.

Another new activity of the division which is proving to be very popular is the work with the muscadine type of grape. With the James variety, it is reported that club members in 11 counties have planted 2,274 vines during the year. Club members in 29 counties report that they have made 6,030 gallons of the grape juice and 1,744 gallons of other grape products.

Seventeen girls received scholarships in schools and colleges during the past year, while 272 are paying a part or all of their educational expenses by work, which they are doing in canning, basketry, grape culture or gardening.


Prison for Franklin People Making Illicit Whiskey, Dec. 12, 1919

From The Franklin Times, Louisburg, N.C., Dec. 12, 1919

Prison Terms for Franklin People. . . Four White Farmers and Three Negroes go to Prison for Making Illicit Whiskey

Franklin county defendants had a bad day in Federal court the past week and seven convicted blockaders received combined sentences of 16 years and 4 days in prison. It was a good showing during the session which disposed of many cases.

Sid Driver and Joe Horton were found guilty of operating an illicit distillery and were sentenced to four years in prison each.

Twitt Robbins was also found guilty under a similar charge and was sentenced to four years in prison.
Will Tharrington, a well known white farmer of Franklin, was given a term of one year and a day in the Atlanta prison for distilling. He was found guilty Friday.

Isaac Warren, Jake Tralor and June Harris, negroes, were sentenced to one year and a day each in prison. They were convicted of making liquor at the same still. Whiskey was found in Harris’ house. Tralor was caught in possession of sugar and meal while Warren was the “watchman” of the kettle, according to evidence.

C.J Sutton, for receiving and concealing whiskey, was fined $100 and costs and placed under a bond to show good behavior at the next term of court.

G.W. Strickland was taxed with the costs for removing and concealing.

Wednesday, December 11, 2019

Xmas Specials, Barker's Dry Goods & Shoe Store, Dec. 11, 1919



Disabled Soldiers Slowly but Surely Repaying Elks Club Loans, Dec. 11, 1919


From The Daily Times, Wilson, N.C., Dec. 11, 1919.

American Soldiers Will Meet Their Obligations

“Be it said to the ever-lasting credit of the American veteran that there does not show on our books that any one of them has shown a disposition to deny his obligations or refuse to meet them,” says Aronnoff, secretary for the Federal board for vocational education.

The statement was made by the secretary of the board while being interviewed regarding the use of a revolving fund of $200,000 advanced by the Elks for use of the disabled soldiers. The books show that more than $230,000 has been loaned, the more than $100,000 has been returned in small payments and that the fund was of great benefit to every disabled man. This money was advanced to the veterans to tide them over the interval between the time they went into training and the arrival of their first bi-monthly check. They are allowed to take from one to six months to refund the loan.

The Elks distributed this $200,000 loan among the 14 districts of the Federal board for vocational education, giving each district vocational officer monies to use at his discretion. In speaking of the loan the district officers united in saying, “The loan has been a God-send to us and to the disable men.”

Rising Waters Provide More Hydroelectric Power, Dec. 11, 1919


From The Daily Times, Wilson, N.C., Dec. 11, 1919

Creek Is Up at Raleigh

Raleigh, Dec. 11—A telephonic message from the regional coal committee of Atlanta received at the local offices of the Carolina Light and Power Company and the Yadkin River Power Company yesterday brought the news that the closing order as to light and power that these companies furnish for the city is lifted again.

On account of the rise in the waters of the Cape Fear and Yadkin rivers the principal plants located on these rivers have notified the regional coal committee that the use of coal could be dispensed with, the hydro-electric power now being sufficient to care for the customers. In the case of the receding of the Cape Fear and Yadkin rivers, the Jones street plant of the Carolina Power and Light Company which now is inactive, will continue so until the hydro-electric plants become unavailable to handle the situation.

As far as lighting and power is concerned, the fuel order in Raleigh is again suspended, it is said, the regulations on the use of coal, wood, gas and coke for fuel continuing. Offices, stores and other business establishments must bank their fires according to the fuel regulations, but may observe the usual hours.

Jewelry Thieves Sentenced in Raleigh, Dec. 11, 1919


From The Daily Times, Wilson, N.C., Dec. 11, 1919. To read about the theft, go to http://ruralnchistory.blogspot.com/2019/11/bell-boy-confesses-his-part-in-theft-of.html

Jewelry Thieves Sentenced

Raleigh, Dec. 11—Three years of hard labor for John Cooke, bellboy, two years of prison life for Richard Blacknall, and terms of 12 months each for James Horton and Hubert Pool, all negroes, was the punishment imposed yesterday by Judge Guion in superior court for the theft of a trunk of jewelry valued at $75,000 from the Yarborough hotel about three weeks ago. The four negroes pleaded guilty of larceny.

Tuesday, December 10, 2019

Guilford College's Power House Destroyed in Midnight Blaze, Dec. 1919

From The Guilfordian, Greensboro, N.C., Dec. 10, 1919

Power House Destroyed in Midnight Blaze. . . College Plunged in Darkness When Fire Wipes Out Central Lighting Plant. . . Boiler Only Slight Damaged, Able to Supply Heat to Girls’ Dormitories

On Thursday night fire destroyed the power plant of the college causing a damage estimated at about $3,000, partly covered by insurance.

The steam engine and dynamo are a total loss, but fortunately the brick wall between the boiler room and the engine room shielded the boiler from the intensest heat and with some slight repairs it has bene able to keep New Garden and Founder’s heated. Oil lamps have been supplied to the students, but it is hoped that arrangements may be speedily completed to bring an electric power line from Greensboro.

The fire was discovered by President Binford about 11:15 p.m. He had just returned home from a conference in Cox Hall regarding the proposed rally for Saturday night, when Mrs. Binford called his attention to what seemed like smoke from the coal piles. He hurried to the power house, where he found the northern end of the dynamo room a mass of flames. His cries roused Cox Hall, but the flames spread so rapidly in the oil-soaked wood that before the doors could be battered won the fire had burned through the roof and the interior was a veritable furnace. A light breeze from the south served to protect nearby buildings from flying sparks, yet it was thought better to conserve the inadequate water for their protection rather than to pour it on the mass of burning oil in a vain attempt to stop its ravages. The fiercest blaze was beside the engine, where three large tanks of oil stood. One of these exploded and threw blazing oil into a group of spectators; fortunately no one was injured.
The boiler, protected from the hottest part of the fire by a brick wall, suffered little, though the roof was burned above it.

Edgar T. Farlow, superintendent, was on the scene soon after the fire was discovered and by daybreak, under his direction, temporary repairs had been made and breakfast time found the dining room in Founder’s and New Garden comfortably heated. Man leaks developed, however, so that it was necessary to draw the fires and make further repairs. This was done so expeditiously that it caused the college almost no inconvenience.

The matter of lights has been more of a problem. Oil lamps were purchased, but seem a poor substitute for electricity. The three kilowatt generator of the Physics Department did valiant service on Friday evening in providing lights for the lecture in Memorial Hall. It also furnished light for the banquet on Saturday night and, barring accident, will probably be able to supply a limited amount of current for other college functions.

On account of the great scarcity of all electrical supplies, efforts looking toward immediate restoration of the power plant met with much discouragement. It has been hoped that connection could be made with the North Carolina Public Service Corporation. A line into the neighborhood has been projected for some months, but is not? Up on account of the impossibility of securing wire and transformers.

Alumni News From Guilford College, Dec. 10, 1919

From The Guilfordian, Greensboro, N.C., Dec. 10, 1919

Alumni Notes

Dr. L.L. Hobbs Jr., ’07, is at home here from the Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia for a two weeks’ vacation.

Dr. Thomas Newlin, since his release from the army as Y.M.C.A. Educational Secretary, has entered the Barton Real Estate Company in Whittler, California.

Augustine W. Blair of New Brunswick, New Jersey, is visiting the family of Dr. L.L. Hobbs.

The following alumni were weekend visitors at the college: Misses Mary Mendenhall, ’13; Grace Taylor, ’17; Mary Taylor, ’11 and ’12; Mr. and Mrs. J.G. Briggs, ’11 and ’12; Miss Ruth Coltrane, ’18; J.G. Reddick, ’18; and Ira Hinshaw, ’18.

Margaret Davis Winslow, ’09, with her two small sons is spending some time here with her parents, Prof. and Mrs. J.F. Davis.

Hazel Armstrong, ’17, is engaged in stenographic work with the Seaboard National Bank, Norfolk, Va.

Helen East, ’14, is teaching algebra in the high school at Springfield, Ill. In this school there are 1,450 students with a working force of 62 teachers.

Robert Dicks, ’04, is treasurer of the Dicks David Company, manufacturers of dyestuffs and chemicals. His office address is 299 Broadway, New York.

Walter W. Medenhall, ’92, is general superintendent of allotment work for the Elwertly Helwick Company, real estate dealers, East Cleveland, Ohio. The following extract is from a communication from him: “I have been with this company nearly 13 years, during which time I have handled the construction of nearly 1,000 homes, and have thus been able to add my mite toward helping to make nearly 1,000 families comfortable. In doing this I have helped to make some good American citizens, for the man who owns his own home is seldom a disturber of the peace and is generally loyal to the American government.”

Eunice Darden Meader, ’95, spent Friday night and part of Saturday at the college. She is now a part of the teaching force in the High Point High School.


Kramer Lecture Focuses on Philosophy of Work, Oct. 10,

From The Guilfordian, Greensboro, N.C., Dec. 10, 1919

Philosophy of Work. . . Lecture by Harold Kramer

The lecture given by Harold Kramer on last Saturday evening was an unusually inspiring and helpful one. Mr. Kramer began by saying that his subject, “Here or Nowhere,” treated the philosophy as he found it was progress along the avenues of life aiding humanity I every possible way. Our lives are ships, and we are the masters of them; so we may either steer them towards success or failure. In lie two opposing forces are always present, namely, truth and error. Truth may not always be the easy way. Life is not easy. Those who have solved the world’s problems have worked and worked hard, to do the worth while things. The easy way is always the way of disaster. Success never comes by chance. It comes by effort. Some people are inclined to blame heredity and environment for their failures, but the people who have really made success in life have been able to live above such things as these.

There is a Divinity, a great, kind, merciful Divinity, one that is immutable and unchanging. The person, then, that receives the greatest gifts is the one who works steadily onward. The chance will come to all. What will you do with it? Put the best into it and life will give you back its best. In closing Mr. Kramer compared life to a magnificent vase, showing that just as love or hate are put into it, just so it overflows love or hate.

Monday, December 9, 2019

Monroe to Erect Big Christmas Tree in Square, Everyone Will Gather to Sing Carols, Santa to Hand Out Gifts to Children, 1919

From The Monroe Journal, Dec. 9, 1919

Donations Coming In for Big Christmas Tree. . . Community Yuletide Cheer for Little Ones Now Assured. . . If There Are Any Destitutes, Give Their Names in to Santa Claus

Up to the time for going to press this afternoon The Journal had received the following contributions toward the fund started by The Journal Friday for the community Christmas Tree for the children of the city:

Monroe Journal, $10
R.A. Morrow, $25

Miss Gertrude Walsh, 50 cents
Mr. and Mrs. C.D. Roberts, $2

Mrs. A.M. Secrest, $1
J.J. Parker, $5

J.V. Kendall, $1
Mrs. Nan Carlile, $1

Monroe Hardware Co., $25
J.A. Stewart, $5

T.P. Dillon, $5
Dr. J.M. Belk, $10

S.L. Rotter, $1
I.H. Blair, $1

Total, $92.50

Let the ball keep rolling and this stone shall gather moss. All are invited to send in their bit to give the little folks a good time. The Journal wants this “gentle and joyous occasion” to be a real community affair in more ways than one. It wants the community to give it as well as enjoy it.

This paper knows full well that there are almost no destitute in our city now, and that is why it feels so good it wasn’t to join with the kiddies and the whole municipality in shouting and singing and having a genuine good old-fashioned Christmas around the big tree on courthouse square, and listen to the best singers in town chime out in glad chorus the sweet old Yuletide carols of its first childhood, and see old Santa Claus in the center of the courthouse hall shout out the glad tidings to each of the little ones as they pass and leave something in every little hand.

Of course, if there should be any, big or little, who can’t have any Christmas cheer of their own, The Journal wants the committee to know of them.

Latest Happenings In and Around Monroe, Dec. 9, 1919

From The Monroe Journal, Dec. 9, 1919

Latest Happenings In and Around Monroe

Mr. R.E. Garrison has gone to Raleigh to drive back two quad trucks loaned by the state highway commission to the Union county road force.

Mr. Alexander Moser, who lives a mile east of town on the Morgan Mill road, suffered a stroke of paralysis Monday.

A Ford car belonging to Mr. B.C. Hinson was stolen from one of the uptown streets Saturday night, and so far has not been recovered.

In advertently the honor roll for the higher fourth grade was omitted form the list given last Friday. It is as follows: Mary D. Fulenwider, Chattie Stack, Mae Sell, Lois Stegall, Anna Mc. Redfearn, Robert Neal, Maurice Redfearn, John Stewart.

Dr. Lee Scarborough, general director of the Baptist $75 Million Campaign, states that $80 million has been pledged and reports continue to pour in. North Carolina’s quota was $6 million and the figures now are very near $7 million, with hundreds of churches yet to hear from.

Rev. S.L. Rotter of St. Paul’s Episcopal church here has just received word from the Church of the Messiah, Rockingham, which he also serves, that the congregation there on Sunday signed contribution pledges doubling the annual budget as a result of the Nation-Wide Campaign for the Church’s Mission.

A Memorial service in honor of Private Jesse Griffin, who lost his life in France, will be conducted at Altan next Sunday at 11 o’clock. This service was postponed from a date several months ago on account of the illness of a relative of the deceased. Private Griffin died of influenza at Brest, having contracted the disease on board ship. He is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Griffin of Buford township.

The Thanksgiving offering for the Oxford orphanage amounted to about $160, and has been sent in to the manager. However, since the above amount was forwarded, several who were not given an opportunity to contribute have handed in several dollars for the fatherless. There may be a few more Masons and other charitably inclined who have been overlooked. If so, a donation left with The Journal this week will be forwarded.

To exist in the bottom of a well for three weeks on nothing but a few honeysuckle vines, yet found in apparent good health, was the experience of a calf belonging to Mr. R.A. Hudson of Sandy Ridge township. The calf was missed about three weeks ago by Mr. Hudson, and was not found until a day or so ago. He is certain it had been in the well all this time. No food reached it, but it was able to nibble some honeysuckle vines which were hanging down in the well from the top. There was no water in the well.

The North Carolina division highway engineer has notified Mr. Ira B. Mullis, county engineer, that bids would be received January 4 for the contract to construct the Monroe township stretch of the Wilmington to Charlotte highway. Mr. Gus Ginn, who was awarded the contract to build the Vance township part of the highway, has commenced operations, a party of engineers now being at work staking off the road.
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Wilson Knocks Blacksmiths Free From Electrical Surge, Bell Died, Stegall Will Recover, Dec. 9, 1919

From The Monroe Journal, Dec. 9, 1919

Wilson Risks His Life to Save Two Men. . . Bell, Negro Blacksmith, Dies from Shock, and Mr. Stegall Probably Owes His Life to Wilson

David Bell, colored, was almost instantly killed and Mr. Paul Stegall would probably have met his death had it not been for the heroic conduct of Mr. M. Wilson Monday morning when 2,200 volts of electricity were thrown into the wires leading into the Austin-Sikes’ shop.

Bell and Mr. Stegall, blacksmiths, were heating a heavy piece of iron in the small forge, the bellows of which is operated by a 200-volt electric motor, when the wires, in some manner, were surcharged with an extra voltage of 2,200. Such strong power immediately electrified the forge, the iron, which the two were holding, and other parts of the shop. The two blacksmiths were unable to drop the iron or pull away from the forge, and it appeared that both would be electrocuted, until Mr. Wilson, who was standing near the shop, went to their aid. Having a slight knowledge of electricity, he knew it would be certain death to grasp the men, and believing it would be equally dangerous to pull the switch on account of the strong voltage in the shop, he quickly decided on extreme measures. Running his right hand up into his coat sleeve, he made a terrific sideswipe lunge at the two, knocking both of them down. Contact with the two men knocked Mr. Wilson unconscious for a few sections, but on recovering he rushed immediately up town for a doctor. Mr. Stegall was knocked almost out of the shop, and his head struck the pavement. He remained unconscious for several minutes, and for a time it was thought he had been killed. Bell died almost instantly.

Shortly after Mr. Bell had risked his life to save Mr. Stegall, Mr. Henry Austin, one of the proprietors of the shop, rushed in and pulled the switch. No one else was in the shop at the time besides the two workmen and Mr. Wilson.

Mr. Wilson’s heroism has elicited the admiration of the Monroe people, and a movement is now on foot to secure him a Carnegie medal. Mayor J.C. Sikes stated this morning that he was going to communicate with the Carnegie foundation committee in an effort to around interest in the young man’s deed. Mr. Wilson has been living in Monroe three years. He is connected with the Monroe Iron and Metal Co.

Bell was considered a good workman. He had been in the employ of the Austin-Sikes Co. for about three years. Mr. Stegall is recovering from his terrible experience, and it is thought he will be able to be at work in a few days.

Sunday, December 8, 2019

Professional Cracksmen Broke Into Lucama Post Office, Store, Bank, Office Sunday Night, Dec. 8, 1919

From The Daily Times, Wilson, N.C., Monday, December 8, 1919

Bold Robbery at Lucama Last Night. . . Post Office, Store and Office Rifled. . . Money and Valuables Taken. . . No Clue to the Robbers

As near as could be ascertained, professional cracksmen visited Lucama in this county, early Sunday morning and entered several stores, the post office and bank building and removed articles of value from each. They got away without observation or leaving any clue as to who they are or as to whence they came. Bloodhounds from Raleigh were sent for and scoured the country round yesterday but nothing was found to lead to their arrest. It is believed they came and departed in automobiles.

The post office was entered and the safe also but no damage was done. The ordinary lock yielded easily to the knowledge of the experts. From the post office was taken $200 in stamps and currency.
The store of Mr. J.R. Lucas was entered and here some $150 worth of clothing and dry goods were taken. Mr. Herbert Lamm, who had been sleeping in a store, happened to be away on Saturday night and at home sick.

The bank was entered, but here they were unable to open the time lock of the safe, and they only secured a few stamps.

The office of Mr. Joe Bass was entered and a pair of shoes and a pistol were taken.

Parties living across the way heard noises and one of them missed a chain from the premises, but thought nothing of the fuss, thinking a dog was around the house.


Thanksgiving Celebrated With Hikes, Tennis, Socials, Community Sing at Guilford College, 1919

From The Guilfordian, Greensboro, N.C., Oct. 10, 1919

Thanksgiving was Fitly Celebrated at Guilford. . . Hikes, Tennis, Socials and a Community Sing Features of Day

The students at Guilford began their celebration of Thanksgiving at an early hour in the form of a hike to the station.

After the hike came tennis, and courts heretofore deserted were seen to be filled with enthusiastic couples.

Those not skilled in the art of tennis playing, but who were well up on the rules of “set-back” socials, could be found in Founder’s Hall.

There was an intermission for dinner, after which the social began and lasted until 3:30.

At 3:30 a community song service was led by Prof. James Westley White, teacher of vocal music, was held in Memorial Hall. Prof. White sang two solos and led the audience in singing patriotic and other familiar songs.

Following the “sing” occurred the annual inspection of dormitories. The girls visited Cox Hall and the boys New Garden and Founder’s halls.

Supper was served informally and was founded by a social in Founder’s Hall.

Saturday, December 7, 2019

The Japanese Bomb Pearl Harbor, Dec. 7, 1941


Mitchell's Chapel Congregation Raises $1,712 in Cash for New Church Building, Dec. 5, 1919

From the front page of the Franklin Times, Louisburg, N.C., Dec. 5, 1919

Raises $1,712 at One Service

At Mitchell’s Chapel in Hayesville Township, a colored Baptist church the congregation responded to a call for help to erect a new church building with a contribution of $1,712 in cash. This is quite a creditable showing for the colored population of that particular section and their actions in this case received the hearty endorsement of their many white friends. It is stated that a modern commodious building will be begun at an early date.

Wanchese Man Grows Sweet Potato 31 1/2 Inches Long, Dec. 4, 1919

From the Elizabeth City Independent, as reprinted in The Review, High Point, N.C., Thursday, December 4, 1919. Last name spelled Daniels and Daniel in newspaper; I don’t know which is correct.

Grows Sweet Potato Nearly a Yard Long

Joe Tom Daniels of Wanchese, Dare county, claims to have grown the largest sweet potato ever grown in northeastern North Carolina. The measurements of the potato as attested by several reliable witnesses were 31 ½ inches in length, 4 inches in diameter and 12 inches round. The potato is of the Hayman variety and was grown on Mr. Daniel’s farm at Wanchese on Roanoke Island.

It will interest many readers of this paper to recall that the common Hayman potato, now generally grown throughout North Carolina was introduced into this country about 75 years ago by Captain Dan Hayman of Croaton, near Wanchese. Captain Hayman brought the first sweet potato slips to Dare county from some of the West Indian islands and the potato has borne his name ever since. Sons of Captain Dan Hayman are still living on Roanoke Island. One of them is Mathias Hayman of Wanchese, the other ex-Sheriff Jeff Hayman of Manteo, both men well known in this city and section.
Mr. Daniels says some one else may have produced a larger potato than his, but he never heard of one.

Govenor Commutes Sentences of Men "Mislead by Outside Agitators," Dec. 3, 1919

From The Hickory Daily Record, Wednesday, December 3, 1919

Bickett Commutes Sentences of Men

Raleigh, Dec. 3—Governor Bickett late last afternoon commuted the sentences of George Lineberry, Grady Boyd, Paul Austin, Duncan Solomon and Nick Simmons, charged with assault with intent to kill and conspiracy to prevent the enforcement of law from four months on the roads to fines of $75 each. These defendants were sentenced as the result of the riot at Albemarle, which Governor Bickett asserted in no uncertain terms was due more to the activities of outside agitators than to the men upon whom road sentences were imposed, with the announcement that he had commuted these sentences, Governor Bickett issued the following statement:

‘These defendants, together with 25 other prisoners, pleaded guilty at the November term of Stanly superior court to a conspiracy to prevent workers from entering a cotton mill to work on the morning of September 15, 1919. The defendants, Marvin I. Ritch and J.H. Graham, were sentenced to pay a fine of $500 and all the other defendants were sentenced to pay fines ranging from $75, downward, except the five defendants above named, who were all given road sentences of four months each.
“A petition is presented to me presenting that the road sentence against the above named defendants be commuted to fines. This petition is signed by all the county officials of Stanly county; by all the town officials of Albemarle; by the pastors of the churches; by the owners and officers of the cotton mills of the town, and by every representative citizen in that community, with whom I am personally acquainted. The evidence in the case discloses that these five men were more sinned against than sinning. They are not men of education, or of means, but are hard working men, and two outside agitators, one a lawyer and one a labor agent, came into court and pleaded guilty to the charge of urging these men to enter into this unlawful conspiracy. The judge who tried the case saw fit in his wisdom, which I do not question, to impose fines upon the chief conspirators, and I do not think that these ignorant people, who followed the advice of men of more education and more experience than themselves ought to be worked on the roads.

“The whole case illustrates how dangerous it is for our people to act upon the advice of outside agitators, who have no jobs in the community, who are not personally interested in the development of the business interests of the community, who have no particular friends in the community, and who have nothing to lose in case the community is stricken with business paralysis. Our people would do well before listening to any agitator to ascertain whether or not he proposes to lose his job when they lose theirs, to go hungry when they go hungry and when the go to jail to go with them. For these reasons the road sentence against each of the five defendants above named is commuted to a fine of $75. Each fine to be paid $5 cash and the balance in installments of $10 every 30 days.

Southern Railway Fires 40 Clerks Who Refused to Punch Time Clocks In Accordance With Union Agreement, Dec. 3, 1919

From the Forest City Courier, Dec. 3, 1919. Today we'd say, "punch the time clock," but in 1919 it was called "checked."  

Clerks Discharged Because They Refused to Punch Time Clock Recently Installed

Spencer—Forty clerks employed in Southern Railway at Spencer were dismissed because they failed to “check” in on a time clock just installed by the authorities who notified the clerks they will be required to check. When the men took seats at their desks, they were asked if they had checked, and when the answer was given in the negative they were notified that their services would no longer be needed. The offices were vacated at once.

Inquiry was made of the leaders and the matter was termed a lock-out, pure and simple. It was stated that this is the only place on the Southern system where clerks have been required to check. It was also stated that the clerks through their union have contracted with the railroad administration, one article of which provides that they will not be required to do anything not formerly practiced. It was on this ground that they refused to check.

Thursday, December 5, 2019

Boxcar of Sugar Derailed at Louisburg Station, Dec. 5, 1919

From the front page of the Franklin Times, Louisburg, N.C., Dec. 5, 1919

Wreck at Station. . . Car of Sugar Hangs on Embankment. . . A Little Further and It Would Be in Street. . . Overhangs Sidewalk

While placing a car of sugar on the siding for the P.A. Reavis Co. to unload early Monday morning the car broke away at the top block at the end of the train just as the top of an embankment adjoining the sidewalk and dropped one end of the car almost clearing the tracks off the embankment over the sidewalk leading to the station, adding the third wreck to the list for this identical point—the other two times the engine went over, one of which the engine and tender both dropped over into the street and killed Tommie Macon, colored.

Evidently the train was backing at a greater speed than was realized and it was a miraculous occurrence that no one was hurt, although it was stated that Mr. W.W. Holmes was passing at the time and thoroughly experienced the thrill. The damage to the car was slight.

Memorial Service for Solder Who Fell in France, Funeral Services for Mariah Ruffin, 14-Month-Old Edward Spivey, Dec. 5, 1919

From the front page of the Franklin Times, Louisburg, N.C., Dec. 5, 1919

Memorial Service at Oak Level Christian Church In Memory of Archie Pearce

Memorial services will be held at Oak Level Christian church on next Sunday, December 7th, 1919, at the usual hour in memory of Archie Pearce, who fell in battle at Mont Jancon, France, on November 21st, 1918, while in action.

Rev. B.F. Black will conduct the services and a fine sermon will be delivered.
The public and especially all soldiers are invited to attend.

-=-

Mariah Ruffin, Colored, Dead

Aunt Mariah Ruffin, one of Franklin County’s respected colored citizens, died almost instantly with Hemorrhages Thursday afternoon in the yard of Mr. Willis Young, while there in service. Aunt Mariah was industrious and polite and had won a large number of friends among the white people, as well as among her own race through her faithful service. She was always willing and ready to help any one in trouble and will be missed by a large number whom she served faithfully while here on earth. Her remains were interred in the colored burying ground at R.T. Clifton’s where she lived, on Saturday afternoon.

-=-

Little Edward Spivey Dead

On November 24th, 1919, Edward Allen Spivey, the little 14-months-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur E. Spivey, died at their home in Cypress Creek township. Edward was the only son and his death leaves a vacancy in the home that time will be long in healing. Everything was done that was possible to do but God in his wisdom evidently needed him to add another star in Heaven’s brightness.
The interment was made on Tuesday in the presence of a large number of relatives and sorrowing friends.

The bereaved family has the sympathy of the entire community.


Report of County Home Fire at Commissioners Meeting, Dec. 5, 1919

From the Franklin Times, Louisburg, N.C., Dec. 5, 1919

Fire At County Home. . . Supt. Holden Reports Near $2,000. . . J.P. Timberlake Re-elected Chairman and Ben T. Holden Re-elected Attorney. . . Other Routine Business

The Board of County Commissioners met in regular session on Monday with all members present. Business was transacted as follows after approving the minutes of the previous meeting:

--Miss Pauline Smith was before the Board and read her report which was received.

--C.H. Roe was allowed his regular pension as an Old Veteran.

--I.N. Tucker was relived of poll tax on account of an afflicted foot.

--Report of J.C. Jones, Superintendent of Public Welfare in regard to Deaf and Dumb mutes was received and filed.

--The new Board met and proceeded to reorganize. Upon motion of W.D. Fuller, former chairman J.P. Timberlake was unanimously re-elected Chairman for the ensuing year.

--The election of an attorney being in order Commissioner Sykes placed the name of Mr. Ben T. Holden before the Board to succeed himself for the ensuing year. The election was unanimous.

--H.C. Taylor was allowed to keep the Taylor Shop at a rent of $10 per month and all repairs until further notice.

--Wash Perry and wife were placed on outside pauper list at $2 each per month.

--Lou Davis was ordered to be sent to County Home.

--Report of Dr. J.E. Malone, County Health Officer, was received and filed.

--W.N. Hight was relived of poll tax for 1919 on account of his physical condition—Sandy Creek township.

--Chairman Timberlake was authorized to draw voucher to take up the $15,000 bond which will be due soon.

--D.G. Pearce, cotton weigher for Louisburg, was before the board with his bond which was ordered recorded and took the oath of office.

--Report of J.J. Holden, Superintendent of County Home, was received and filed. He reports inmates as follows: White, 4 women, 3 men; colored, 4 women, 5 men. He also turned over check for $275.13 to cover crops marketed since last report. He further reported that one stable or barn was burned on Sunday, November 30th, at 3 p.m., a complete loss of barn and a lot of dry feed stored therein. Fire must have originated from flying sparks from chimney of inmates house. (In his report for November 1st, he turned in to the Commissioners $1,566.94 from crops marketed, which was inadvertently omitted).

--Sheriff H.A. Kearney assisted the Board to draw the jurors for January term of Franklin Superior Court.

After allowing a number of accounts the Board adjourned to next regular meeting.


Wednesday, December 4, 2019

High Point Grocers Accused of Incorrect Measurement of Dry Commodities, Dec. 4, 1919

From The Review, High Point, N.C., Thursday, December 4, 1919

Local Grocers In Court Saturday

Civil action against a number of High Point grocers was instituted last week by W.B. Young, Guilford County’s keep of standard weights and measures, who contended that they had used liquid measures in handling commodities for sale when they should have used dry measures.

The cases came up for a hearing before Justice of the Peace D.H. Collins of Greensboro Saturday. The following local grocers were penalized: R.F. Powell, A. Robertson, J.C. Kivett, A.O. Raper, C.B. Welch, R.W. Steward, T.J. Steed, W.B. Evans, A.J. Jones, J.S. Guyer and C.B. Houser.

Judgment against the alleged offenders for $40 was rendered in each case by the justice, while the costs were also assessed against the defendant. There is a law that the standard keeper or person bringing the action can recover the penalty.

J.S. Guyer and C.B. Houser paid the penalties imposed by the court, while the other defendants entered notice of appeal. Their cases will probably be tried at the next term of Guilford superior court.

News Briefs from High Point, Dec. 4, 1919


Collection of short articles from the front page of The Review, High Point, N.C., Thursday, December 4, 1919

Condition of Bob Welch Serious

The condition of J. Robert Welch, who Friday suffered a stroke of paralysis and is now confined to his home, 805 North Main Street, is still regarded as serious today.

Jitney Skids and Turns Turtle

The Greensboro-High Point jitney went on a tear Saturday afternoon and after skidding around a few squares turned turtle and spilled the occupants out. Passing autoists brought the injured to High Point. One man had a fractured arm while others were slightly bruised.

Mad Calf Bites Farmer’s Hand

A.A. Ingram, a well known farmer, was in the city last week consulting a physician regarding a slight wound he recently received when bitten by a calf at his farm near High Point.

Mr. Ingram said investigation revealed that the calf was recently bitten by a dog believe to have been made. The calf, shortly after it was bitten, began to act strange and attacked his chickens. The calf was killed and its head forwarded to Raleigh. If it is found that the calf was infected, Mr. Ingram says that he will leave at once for Raleigh and take the Pasteur treatment.

We Win, As Usual

High Point worsted Spencer in a basketball game at the armory Friday night to the tune of 27 to 14. A large crowd witnessed the game.

Tax Collector in City this Week

Division Deputy Collector H. Hoyle Sink of Lexington arrived in High Point Monday and will remain here all this week collecting taxes. He will be in his office in the post office building from 1 to 3 o’clock Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday afternoons. He will spend the remainder of the time he is in the city out calling on taxpayers.

New Clerk at Jewelry Store

Miss Margaret Mungo has accepted a position with the Stamey’s Jewelry store where she will be pleased to see her friends.

Cuts a Caper

Ben Johnson, a white man, tried to have too much Thanksgiving and the result was a home in the lockup and facing Judge Kirkman the next morning on three separate and distinct counts, totaling over $50.

Forthcoming Marriage

Announcements have been sent out regarding the wedding of Miss Mary Alice Campbell to Eugene Donald Idol of Pleasant Garden, the wedding to take place the last of this month in this city where the bride resides.


World War I In Photo: A Century Later

World War I In Photos: A Century Later, from The Atlantic, published in the April 2014 issue. this photo was taken by Vincent Kessler for the magazine. To read the story and see the other photos, go to:
https://www.theatlantic.com/photo/2014/04/world-war-i-in-photos-a-century-later/507341/


Tuesday, December 3, 2019

Henderson Fire Destroys Union Seed and Fertilizer Company, Dec. 3, 1919

From The Hickory Daily Record, Wednesday, December 3, 1919

Fire at Henderson Does Much Damage

By the Associated Press

Henderson, N.C., Dec. 3—Damage estimated by company officials at $300,000 was done to the plant of the Union Seed and Fertilizer Company here this morning. The flames started in a storage warehouse containing 200,000 tons of cotton seed and spread to the fertilizer plant, which was completely destroyed The loss is covered by insurance.


Albemarle Strikers Guilty of Ignorance, Lead Astray by Union Leaders, Says Governor, Dec. 3, 1919

From The Hickory Daily Record, Wednesday, December 3, 1919

Bickett Commutes Sentences of Men

Raleigh, Dec. 3—Governor Bickett late last afternoon commuted the sentences of George Lineberry, Grady Boyd, Paul Austin, Duncan Solomon and Nick Simmons, charged with assault with intent to kill and conspiracy to prevent the enforcement of law from four months on the roads to fines of $75 each. These defendants were sentenced as the result of the riot at Albemarle, which Governor Bickett asserted in no uncertain terms was due more to the activities of outside agitators than to the men upon whom road sentences were imposed, with the announcement that he had commuted these sentences, Governor Bickett issued the following statement:

‘These defendants, together with 25 other prisoners, pleaded guilty at the November term of Stanly superior court to a conspiracy to prevent workers from entering a cotton mill to work on the morning of September 15, 1919. The defendants, Marvin I. Ritch and J.H. Graham, were sentenced to pay a fine of $500 and all the other defendants were sentenced to pay fines ranging from $75, downward, except the five defendants above named, who were all given road sentences of four months each.

“A petition is presented to me presenting that the road sentence against the above named defendants be commuted to fines. This petition is signed by all the county officials of Stanly county; by all the town officials of Albemarle; by the pastors of the churches; by the owners and officers of the cotton mills of the town, and by every representative citizen in that community, with whom I am personally acquainted. The evidence in the case discloses that these five men were more sinned against than sinning. They are not men of education, or of means, but are hard working men, and two outside agitators, one a lawyer and one a labor agent, came into court and pleaded guilty to the charge of urging these men to enter into this unlawful conspiracy. The judge who tried the case saw fit in his wisdom, which I do not question, to impose fines upon the chief conspirators, and I do not think that these ignorant people, who followed the advice of men of more education and more experience than themselves ought to be worked on the roads.

“The whole case illustrates how dangerous it is for our people to act upon the advice of outside agitators, who have no jobs in the community, who are not personally interested in the development of the business interests of the community, who have no particular friends in the community, and who have nothing to lose in case the community is stricken with business paralysis. Our people would do well before listening to any agitator to ascertain whether or not he proposes to lose his job when they lose theirs, to go hungry when they go hungry and when the go to jail to go with them. For these reasons the road sentence against each of the five defendants above named is commuted to a fine of $75. Each fine to be paid $5 cash and the balance in installments of $10 every 30 days.

Council Moves Ahead on Municipal Building, Restricting Jitneys, and Will No Longer Fight Fires in Suburbs, Manufacturing Plants Since They Don't Pay for Services, Dec. 3, 1919

From The Hickory Daily Record, Wednesday, December 3, 1919

Municipal Building Plans Approved by Council; Jitney Ordinance Passed

Members of the city council last night had their first view of the proposed municipal building and it looked so good to them that they ordered Architect C.C. Hook of Charlotte, who submitted plans, to draw up working plans and submit them as soon as practicable. The building will cost around $100,000 and will be complete in every detail.

In addition to quarters for the various city officers, the building will house the fire department, contain court rooms, fire station, police station, a rest room for ladies and a semi-public toilet. It also will provide for a lobby in which will be a placed a table or tablets commorative of the Hickory soldiers who lost their lives during the war. The idea submitted by the local post of the American Legion appealed to the board and it was believed that the lobby leading from the entrance to auditorium, which will seat about 1,000 people can be made a place of beauty and pride.

So great is the need for an auditorium in connection with the municipal building and anxious have the people of Hickory been for such an assembly room, that everybody will wait with impatience until it is completed. Mayor Elliott, who is a contractor, and Mr. Hook thought the building if begun early in the spring, could be completed next year and would be ready by the first of 1921.

Mr. Hook showed the plans in detail. The Record has ordered a cut of the building, together with a brief description of it, and expects to present it as soon as the architect can submit the sketch to the engraver.

Council met last night in its temporary quarters over Deitz’s barber shop, having been forced out of the old room to let the express company occupy the much-needed space. For the time being the new location will serve.

The first matter acted upon by the board last night was the passing of the ordinance held in suspension a few weeks ago requiring jitney cars to keep off Federal street between the railroad and Ninth avenue. The two telephone installed in front of the sun dial in the park sidewalk also were ordered removed and jitneys may approach the depot on the south side only when trains arrive. Much complaint, it was stated, had been heard on many sides and the ordinance went into effect at noon today.

The sun dial has been ordered removed from the sidewalk in front of the depot park and the city manager will have it carried to the cemetery and placed at a suitable spot there.

Hickory firemen, in accordance with an ordinance on the books, will not be permitted to respond to fire alarms outside of the city limits in future. The matter was brought up by Chief H.E. Whitener, who said that he wanted to know what the department must do. Inasmuch as none of the suburbs has sown a disposition to assist in equipping the community with apparatus, the board felt that they were not entitled to the services of the truck, and no alarm out of the city will be answered. Should the manufacturing plants or towns in the outlying districts care to take the matter up, the city will be willing to meet half way in an effort to agree on terms. Otherwise, the city will attend to its own fires.

13 Months After Armistice, U.S. Hasn't Signed Peace Treaty, Dec. 3, 1919

From the editorial page of The Hickory Daily Record, Wednesday, December 3, 1919

What Will America Do?

Dr. Paul S. Leinbach rings clear in an editorial in the Reformed Church Messenger which we think is of vital interest to us at this present moment. May we ponder it well:

The treaty of peace is in a state of coma. The United States Senate has run away from its job. Like a bunch of guilty school boys, the members of the two parties are pointing their fingers at each other and seeking to place the blame on the other side. Opponents like the New York Sun say the treaty is dead beyond all hope of resurrection; others say it can be revived, but lies maimed, bleeding, in a condition of suspended animation. It will be difficult to shake the conviction that a blind and stubborn partisanship has won the victory over broad-minded statesmanship, and that the prestige of our county has suffered immeasurably through a lack of noble leadership. The practically unanimous appeals of the Christina people of America have been treated with an almost unbelievable contempt (next words obscured) not easy to remain hopeful in the face of such evidences of parochialism, stubbornness, and materialism.

Readers of the Messenger doubtless notice the pathetic appeal of General Jan Smuts of South America, which, strange to say, arrived in this country an hour after the senate had rejected the treaty of peace. It was a plea that America should not disappoint the hopes of mankind and abandon the world it its fate. But such a possibility as that the heart of the world might easily be broken by the infidelity of America to her high opportunities and responsibilities, has become the butt for jests and sneers on the part of those who blatantly proclaim that genuine patriotism is synonymous with a selfish and exclusive nationalism. We are sure that the news of the defeat of the Treaty has bought great grief to many thousands of oppressed and imperiled people all over the world.

However, as the Messenger said last week, “The war is by no means lost.” We are not ready yet to believe that the treaty will be finally rejected, nor will we accept the claim that it will be accepted in a maimed and anemic condition, which would be disgrace to our country. There has been a lack of considerateness and conciliation on both sides, such as becomes Christian gentlemen and Americans.

Some sort of reservations may be advisable, but we believe that what is called a reservation is a bit of arrant hypocrisy when it undoes the thing which it dishonestly presumes to qualify. We have not believed that the American people are willing to enter into an agreement in which they absolve themselves in advance from moral obligations and self-sacrifices for the welfare of others. The very spirit which purposes such an attitude is detestable, and it cannot ultimately triumph because it is in opposition to the mind of Christ.

During the next few weeks the followers of the Master can render a great service by their prayers and their influence in helping to arouse a righteous public sentiment and to compel our recalcitrant leaders to do their duty, for after all the President and the senators alike are not lords, but servants of the people, and it is the duty of the hour to make those who “believe in peace and pursue it” an “articulate, imperative, unyielding solidarity.”

Those who are in a position to know tell us that every religious journal in America is in favor of the treaty of peace. We merely make this statement for the serious consideration: Why are they?


Monday, December 2, 2019

Local News Briefs From Monroe, Dec. 2, 1919

From The Monroe Journal, Tuesday, December 2, 1919

Local Intelligence. . . Latest Happenings In and Around Monroe

Mrs. G.M. Laney is very ill at her home in Buford township.

Messrs. T.B. Laney and Henry Shute are recovering from illness after being confined for some time.

Mr. Jeptha Nash of Goose Creek township went to Charlotte yesterday to have a minor operation performed.

Rev. R.M. Haigie will preach at Macedonia Saturday at 2 p.m., and Sunday at 11 a.m. The public is cordially invited to attend.

Mr. C.E. Medlin son of Mr. and Mrs. Garrison Medlin, has charge of the North Carolina sales of the Georgia-Alabama Syrup Company and is making his headquarters here.

Capt. W.L. Howie requests The Journal to express his thanks to the members of the fire company, to Messrs. J.W. Fowler, Eugene Ashcraft and others for the good work they did in extinguishing the fire in his house and saving the furniture.

In conjunction with the poultry exhibits the Monroe Poultry Show will stage a corn exhibit in January. Prizes will be offered for the best ears of corn and Mr. T.P. Dillon, the president, urges the farmers to prepare for this feature of the show.

Mr. W.F. Alexander, whose home was destroyed by the fire last week, tells The Journal that his damaged amount to $4,000 with only $1,000 insurance. The fire occurred about 10:30 in the morning and it is not known how it originated.

Henry Polk, young son of Mr. J.L. Polk of Mineral Springs, who was badly injured in an automobile wreck two weeks ago, continues to improve at the Charlotte hospital where he was taken for treatment the day after the occurrence. It is thought he will be able to return home in a week or 10 days.

The Wingate Farmers Business Union will meet next Friday night, Dec. 5, at 7 o’clock. Mr. T.J.W. Broom will be there to address the meeting. The fertilizer subject will be discussed, orders taken, etc. Officers for next year will be elected. This is a very important meeting and every member is urged to be present.

The following were among the man Monroe people who attended the Virginia-Carolina game at Chapel Hill Thanksgiving Day: Messrs. John Fairley, Joe Heath, I.H. Blair, A.A. Heath, John Redwine, Ogburn Yates, John Wray, Tom, Robert and Sara Lee, Olin McManus, W.B. and W.A. Love.

The 150  dozen eggs contributed by the school children of the county to the Red Cross “egg shower” have been sold to The W.J. Rudge Co. for 75 cents a dozen, or a total of $112.75. They will be sold by Mr. Rudge for $1 per dozen, and the difference to be donated to the Ellen Fitzgerald hospital.

Mr. John Ellis Jones, son of Mr. James Jones, and Miss Ruby Collins, daughter of Mr. Oscar Collins, all of Marshville township, were married Sunday at the residence of Mr. Ellison Mullis, Esq. Zeb M. Little officiating in the presence of a few friends. The bride and groom are popular young people who have the best wishes of their many friends.

Mr. John Tarlton, son of Mr. Cull W. Tarlton of New Salem, and Miss Helms, daughter of Mr. Henry E. Helms of Goose Creek township, were married the 23rd at the residence of Esq. T.C. Griffin in Marshville township the ceremony being performed by Esq. Zeb M. Little. These are popular young people and have the congratulations of their many friends.

Mr. Will Kids, son of Mr. and Mrs. W.R. Kids of Huntersville, and Miss Pattie Noles of Stallings were married on Thanksgiving day and left immediately for a bridal trip to cities in Eastern Carolina. On their return they will be at home in Huntersville. Mrs. Kids is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S.A. Noles and is a young lady of attractive personality.

The Union county medical society, in session yesterday in the Masonic hall, elected the following officers to serve the ensuing year: Dr. R. Armfield, president; Dr. H.D. Stewart, vice-president; and Dr. R.L. Payne, secretary and treasurer. Dr. S.A. Stevens was chosen to represent the local society at the state meeting, which will be held in April. Many questions pertaining to the medical profession were discussed.

The left eye-lid of the 7-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. John McGill, who lives on Crawford street, was badly cut yesterday afternoon when the lad’s face was struck by a piece of glass, thrown by a companion. Luckily, the eye-sight is not impaired. A small vein was severed above the eye and the little fellow almost bled to death before medical aid reached him.

A number of the best colored farmers of the County gathered here Monday for the purpose of organizing a farm club. Several weeks ago they received letters from a Greensboro colored man, claiming to be working under the North Carolina extension bureau, stating he would be here yesterday to perfect a Union County club. However, he failed to show up, and the colored farmers went home to await further developments.

While she was standing late Saturday afternoon in the yard of her home on the Griffith place, three miles from Monroe, the tip of Mrs. Bill McManus’ nose was clipped off by a stray rifle bullet. She was not otherwise injured, but thought at the time that her head had been penetrated by the bullet. The shot was fired by hunters in a stretch of woods near her house. The wound will only make a slight scar, it is thought.

A mass meeting was held in the court house last Friday evening to discuss the matter of issuing more bonds for the high school building, the $50 previously issued being inadequate. The following committee was appointed to canvass the city to ascertain the wish of the voters in regard to the matter: Messrs. T.P. Dillon, G.S. Lee Sr., J.W. Lathan, J.B. Simpson, F.G. Henderson, J.A. Beasley, J.C. Sikes, W.H. Love, T.L. Riddle and W.R. Morrow.

Miss Cynthia Broom and Mr. Jessie B. Parker were married last Sunday evening at the parsonage at Mt. Prospect. Both young people are from families prominent in the county, the bride being a daughter of Mr. S.F. Broom and a young woman of charm and prospect. Mr. Johnson, pastor of the church, performing the ceremony. Mr. Parke is the son of Mr. and Mrs. S.M. Parker and is a prosperous young farmer. He served in the army overseas for 10 months.

One of the most interesting cotton stories of the year is related by Mr. T.B. Cook of Buford township, who recently sold a bail of long staple cotton on the Monroe market at 82 cents a pound. At the time he planted the seed which produced this staple he was not aware of their variety, and to this day does not known from what section of the country they came from. It happened this way: While attending an express “old hoss” sale he bid $1.60 for an innocent looking package. In the twinkling of an eye it was knocked down to hi for this price, and he made haste to discover the contents of his purchase. To say the least, he was disappointed to find he had bought cotton seed; but, for an experiment, he planted them on about an acre of ground. In the summer, when the bolls began to open, he recognized the cotton as long staple. The staple from these seed measured an inch and three-eights, and the cotton and see from his purchase have netted him about $500.

Mrs. Margaret Faulkner, principal of Icemorlee school, and Miss Christine Helms of Unionville spent the week-end in Charlotte visiting friends at Queen’s College.